Revival of the Wye

This particular post is not the sort I have blogged about before, it is about an organisation that I am very much involved in at the moment; this brilliant – if I do say so myself – organisation is known as Revive the Wye; if you live locally then you’ll know something of what that means, but for those who don’t, I’ll explain. Revive the Wye is an organisation that has sprung up due to, in my opinion, gross negligence of a fantastic natural resource, one that is sitting right under our noses. This fantastic natural resource is the diverse and wildlife rich river known as The River Wye – The River Wye is very beautiful river and should be highly treasured for what it is – in words taken directly from the site, “It is one of only a few rare chalk stream habitats in the South Buckinghamshire Chilterns. For many centuries the Wye has also been the main natural artery through Wycombe District and High Wycombe town, providing the foundation for the area’s economic and social development. It has a fascinating history”.

But the snag that pulled my strings and got me involved was the closeness that I felt to this particular body of water, it allowed me to really get involved in a project that I could not only access easily, but see and even feel the effects of; If you wish to know more about what the Revive the Wye hopes to achieve then you can visit the site here: http://www.revivethewye.org.uk/about-us-2/.

Revive the Wye operates as a Partnership. It is managed by a Steering Group that includes representatives from the three founding charities and from Wycombe District Council, the Chiltern Chalk Streams Project, the Chiltern Rangers and the Environment Agency. It is supported by an enthusiastic group of volunteers. All of these groups have come together as one, united to improve the situation here and ensure that in the years to come, the Wye is flowing strong and clear through the hills and dales of Wycombe.

But you may be thinking…why?, Why have these groups and more people come together to ensure the survival of this river. There are many, many reasons, but one that stands out for me is the wildlife that exists at the Wye and enriches the great beauty of the surrounding area and also the people that live here. Among other wildlife includes herons, little egrets, mute swans, brown trout, moorhens and many more –

Egret perched upon vegetation - courtesy of Revive the Wye website

Egret perched upon vegetation – courtesy of Revive the Wye website

A Kingfisher enjoying a mayfly in the sun - courtesy of Revive the Wye website

A Kingfisher enjoying a mayfly in the sun – courtesy of Revive the Wye website

A water vole pokes its head out from under the vegettation - courtesy of Revive the Wye website

A water vole pokes its head out from under the vegettation – courtesy of Revive the Wye website

Beautiful photograph of a Kingfisher -  courtesy of Revive the Wye website

Beautiful photograph of a Kingfisher – courtesy of Revive the Wye website

A mute swan with cygnets - courtesy of Revive the Wye website

A mute swan with cygnets – courtesy of Revive the Wye website

A Brown trout swimming through the Wye - courtesy of Revive the Wye website

A Brown trout swimming through the Wye – courtesy of Revive the Wye website

These photographs show the natural history of the Wye.

I leave you with both a description and a message; if you’d like to support this organisation and the great achievements that can be brought to fruit by your involvement then consider becoming a Friend of the Wye. Put Saturday 14 May in your diary as this is when a Friends event is being held in order to drum up so much needed support for Revive the Wye. Let me know your interest and I’ll pass your contact details to the organiser, James Donald, who will get in touch with further information.

As I stand, swaying slightly in the cool breeze, on the moist bank of the river, amongst the tall, firm bulrushes; I stare downwards into the clear depths of a towns blood. A cocktail of vegetation, natural history and the rich scent of damp mud. A curious male moorhen cocks his head, padding over wet ground with wide feet and a beak of bright scarlet, as the ribbon of a herons neck snakes out from the bracken, eyes quick and sharp, flashing in the sun. That cool breeze flows through the grass once more. Life goes on.

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